At the Intersection: technology, CommonCore, and PBL

11 10 2012
As I’m working with educators across the US and Kansas, I find that many of us are trying to figure out how to juggle our new technology investments with the new Common Core Standards. I get asked about where will they fit together. How we can ensure that we’re using the high-dollar investments to the best purpose to meet the standards.

At the same time, we’re also hearing that Common Core will change instruction. It will change how our rooms and buildings work. It will change how teachers interact with kids. It will change how kids will interact with the curriculum. But what does that mean? What will it look like? It can’t be chaos. It’s got to be some sort of logical method or we’ll be in even worse shape than we’re in now.

Yes, it’s a confusing world with many more questions than answers, (thank goodness)!

In an effort to figure out how this all works together, I created a little sketch that helped me visualize how it all fits together. I’d like to share the explanation with you:

original, Ginger Lewman

  • I see the Common Core as the vehicle we’re all in. States have adopted this vehicle and as educators, we are all now inspecting our own rides. Does it have a transmission I’m used to or am I going to have to shift gears differently? Are the seats different? Is there enough trunk space? Essentially, we’re discovering if it will fit the needs of our school families.
  • Once we have that car, we have to figure out how we’re going to use it or how we’re going to get it moving. I see technology as the fuel that provides the energy that gets us down the road. Sure, we could leave technology out of the picture, but the car isn’t going to travel as well with us pushing it by hand. The proper use of technology allows our passengers, our school families, to go farther and experience more of life as we go.
  • Finally, once we are familiar with the features and we’ve decided how we’re going to get it moving, we can then choose to drive/push that car through pastures and ditches, or we can drive on roads, which are a much more effective way to get places in a car. I see Project Based Learning as being that road, or actually, a network of roads. Because in order to get to many different destinations, and that being getting our kids to their futures (none of them end up at the same place, do they?) there are many roads we can travel. Not all of us are going to exactly the same place all at the same time, nor do we need to travel the exact same roads, even if we are going to the same places. Someone might rather take the scenic route and some may prefer the super-highway. I see Project Based Learning the smoother and multi-functional option for us to get to where we want to go.

What do you think? Have I hit the mark or am I off target with my visualizations?
Is there anything you’d add or take away from the picture for your own vision?

Advertisements

Actions

Information

8 responses

13 10 2012
At the Intersection: technology, CommonCore, and PBL | Gregg Festa's Daily Scoops for Teaching and Learning in the Digital Age (and the future of education) | Scoop.it

[…] At the Intersection: technology, CommonCore, and PBLAs I’m working with educators across the US and Kansas, I find that many of us are trying to figure out how to juggle our new technology investments with the new Common Core Standards. I get asked about where will they fit together. How we can ensure that we’re using the high-dollar investments to the best purpose to meet the standards.At the same time, we’re also hearing that Common Core will change instruction. It will change how our rooms and buildings work. It will change how teachers interact with kids. It will change how kids will interact with the curriculum. But what does that mean? What will it look like? It can’t be chaos. It’s got to be some sort of logical method or we’ll be in even worse shape than we’re in now. Yes, it’s a confusing world with many more questions than answers, (thank goodness)!  […]

14 10 2012
At the Intersection: technology, CommonCore, and PBL | New Learning - Ny læring | Scoop.it

[…] As I’m working with educators across the US and Kansas, I find that many of us are trying to figure out how to juggle our new technology investments with the new Common Core Standards. I get …  […]

16 10 2012
Donna Teuber

Our district is in the middle of a 1:1 initiative and your graphic is perfect for the TPACK model that we’re using. Do you mind if I share this with our planning group?

16 10 2012
GingerLewman

I would be *honored* to have you share this with your planning group. If you want to point them back this direction, too, that’d be great.
Thanks for asking!

18 10 2012
At the Intersection: technology, CommonCore, and PBL | U-32 MS News | Scoop.it

[…] As I’m working with educators across the US and Kansas, I find that many of us are trying to figure out how to juggle our new technology investments with the new Common Core Standards. I get …  […]

18 10 2012
Laurie Nesrala

Hi, Ginger. I’m a big fan of metaphors and this one rocks!

One of my concerns related to this topic is that of equity. Many of our poorest students have no, limited, and/or inequitable access to technology, including computers, mobile devices, internet connectivity, as well as instruction on their use. In other words, they can’t afford the gas and they don’t know how to use the pump! If all of our students are to have equitable opportunities to master the Common Core, this issue needs to be high on the list of things educators and communities must address. I work for the San Diego County Office of Education (SDCOE), which is collaborating with local and state businesses and communities on a Broadband Initiative with the goal of providing connectivity to all students and families in the county:
http://www.sdcoe.net/technology/welcome.asp?loc=broad&m=2

Also SDCOE is soon piloting new online courses for educators such as “Digital Literacy,” “Media in the Common Core” and “Enhancing Project-based Learning through Digital Media” (which I co-authored and will co-teach starting Oct. 29th): http://edtechpd.sdcoe.net/digital-literacy

May I use your intersection drawing in that course? I would, of course, credit you and refer course participants to your website via a link.

Thanks for your consideration of this request…..and keep those Common Core metaphors coming! (I also immensely enjoyed the xtranormal video you shared!)

Laurie Nesrala
WRITE Institute
San DIego County Office of Education

19 10 2012
GingerLewman

Laurie, I agree with you about how it is so very important to invest wisely in the right technology. I think, though, that instead of the kids not being able to afford the gas, it’s more about the schools not affording the gas (or making the gas a priority in the budget) and therefore the kids (and teachers) aren’t learning how to use the pump. And some schools are simply buying the wrong kind of gas before checking to see what type the road conditions and car need. And many, many schools are still buying horse feed.

Either way, the result is the same: students and staff are being asked to push their cars to their destinations. That’s rough.

As for using the picture, I think that’s wonderful. Please do!

24 10 2012
Lisa Lund

This is a great analology and a great way for teachers to understand how technology intergration is an integral part of instruction. Professional Development is the key to helping teachers, students and community understand that the car needs high quality fuel that fits the needs of all students and different pieces of curriculum. If you put the wrong gas or do not know how to use the gas in the car you will not move any further down the road.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s




%d bloggers like this: